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CANCER PREDISPOSITION PANELS

When it comes to cancer diagnosis, speed and accuracy make all the difference. Thanks to our cancer panels, the diagnoses may be faster and more effective than it was ever before.

The DNA Research Center is a world-class research facility that will revolutionize the way we diagnose and treat cancer. The Centre as the first one in Poland offers three cancer panels targeting genes previously linked to a genetic predisposition towards cancer.

I - Panel 170 PLUS

Targets over 1700 exons, spanning 94 genes of interests and additional 284 SNPs occurring in 78 different genes - associated with a predisposition towards cancer.

Panel 170 PLUS includes genes associated with both common (e.g., breast cancer, prostate, hematologic malignancies, colorectal, lung, kidney) and rare cancers. In addition, the set includes 284 SNPs found to correlate with cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Content selection was based on expert interpretation of the scientific literature and other high-quality resources.

 Genes, whose whole coding sequence is captured:

AIP

ALK

APC

ATM

BAP1

BLM

BMPR1A

BRCA1

BRCA2

BRIP1

BUB1B

CDC73

CDH1

CDK4

CDKN1C

CDKN2A

CEBPA

CEP57

CHEK2

CYLD

DDB2

DICER1

DIS3L2

EGFR

EPCAM

ERCC2

ERCC3

ERCC4

ERCC5

EXT1

EXT2

EZH2

FANCA

FANCB

FANCC

FANCD2

FANCE

FANCF

FANCG

FANCI

FANCL

FANCM

FH

FLCN

GATA2

GPC3

HNF1A

HRAS

KIT

MAX

MEN1

MET

MLH1

MSH2

MSH6

MUTYH

NBN

NF1

NF2

NSD1

PALB2

PHOX2B

PMS1

PMS2

PRF1

PRKAR1A

PTCH1

PTEN

RAD51C

RAD51D

RB1

RECQL4

RET

RHBDF2

RUNX1

SBDS

SDHAF2

SDHB

SDHC

SDHD

SLX4

SMAD4

SMARCB1

STK11

SUFU

TMEM127

TP53

TSC1

TSC2

VHL

WRN

WT1

XPA

XPC

 

 

 

 

 

 Panel 170 PLUS includes:

DISEASE NUMBER OF GENES
Prostate cancer 58
Breast cancer 36
Colorectal cancer 31
Hematological malignancies 31
Renal cell carcinomas 13
Lung cancer 15
Skin cancers 14
Esophageal carcinomas 12
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma 9
Pancreatic cancer 12
Bladder cancer   9
Thyroid cancer 8
Central nervous system tumors (including glioma, meningioma) 14
Testicular germ cell tumor 9
Gastric cancer 9
Ovarian cancer 9
Hepatocellular carcinoma 4
Bone tumor (Ewing's sarcoma) 3
Monoclonal gammopathy 3
Follicular lymphoma 2
Systemic lupus erythemotosus 1


Hematological malignancies include:

DISEASE NUMBER OF GENES
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) 12
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) 11
Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) 6
Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) 1
Myeloprolifetative neoplasms 1


II - Panel "For Him"

Targets the whole exons, spanning 54 genes of interests and additional 45 SNPs occurring in 45 different genes - associated with a predisposition towards the most common male cancers.

Panel "For Him" includes genes associatedcancers, like: prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, testicular germ cell tumor. In addition, the set includes 45 SNPs found to correlate with analyzed cancers through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Content selection was based on expert interpretation of the scientific literature and other high-quality resources.

Panel "For Him" includes:

DISEASE NUMBER OF GENES
Prostate cancer 58
Colorectal cancer 31
Lung cancer 15
Testicular germ cell tumor 9

 

III - Panel "For Her"

Targets the whole exons, spanning 48 genes of interests and additional 22 SNPs occurring in 22 different genes - associated with a predisposition towards the most common female cancers.

Panel "For Her" includes genes associated with the cancers, like: breast, colorectal, lung and ovarian cancer. In addition, the set includes 22 SNPs found to correlate with analyzed cancers through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Content selection was based on expert interpretation of the scientific literature and other high-quality resources.

Panel "For Her" includes:

DISEASE NUMBER OF GENES
Breast cancer 36
Colorectal cancer 31
Lung cancer 15
Testicular germ cell tumor 9


For whom are cancer predisposition panels and why?

Cancer is the second-leading cause of death worldwide (cardiovascular disease is number one). The panel is designed for people who take care of their health and future. For people who consciously want to fight with the risk of cancer development. However it is also addressed for patients with diagnosed cancer of unknown etiology. Knowledge gained from the research will allow an early prevention and reduction of cancer risk development, as well as facilitate the fight with cancer on an early stage of its progression.

This will allow for fast, reliable, relatively inexpensive identification of the causative agent. Knowledge of person’s genetic make-up can be vital when treating cancer. Genetic tests can provide information about the cause of the cancer and can aid decisions about the best treatments and medication - Conventional cancer diagnostic, currently is very restricted to the diagnosis of only single mutations in a single genes. The aim of the DNA Research Center was to use new technologies to perform a single test that can analyze all genetic information relevant to cancer, much faster and cheaper, than current methods.

We use next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to target specific genes or mutations that have established relevancy to a particular cancer phenotype. NGS permits sequencing of large genomic regions, high numbers of genes and/or high numbers of samples in a single efficient and cost-effective assay. In addition, NGS provides significantly higher sensitivity than traditional techniques, which permits the discovery of rare somatic mutations, many of which have been identified as important cancer drivers.

Personalized cancer treatment

Genetic testing is a new powerful tool that will transform the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. We now know that patients with the same type of cancer may respond differently to the same treatment. This is due to differing genetic mutations in individual tumors and patient’s own individual genetic profile.

Molecular diagnosis uses this information to help identify who may benefit from which specific therapies. When using molecular diagnosis, treatment can be tailored to suit patients’ individual needs rather than using the traditional one-size-fits-all approach of conventional chemotherapy.

The DNA Research Center is already leading the way in providing patients with routine molecular diagnosis for selected tumor types in. New cancer panels expanded this ground-breaking work by including all tumor types by analyzing over one hundred of genes previously linked to a genetic predisposition towards cancer. That approach will revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of cancer as we know it.

More access to genetic testing

At present, patient access to genetic tests is still very restricted due to their high costs and the long time needed to produce results. Though this is set to change dramatically , with new advances in DNA sequencing technology that the DNA Research Center offers. Cancer panels that the DNA Research Center presents , use the newest DNA sequencing techniques to detect a wide range of mutations in a wide range of genes.

The tests are able to cover more cancers and more treatments, all for a fraction of cost to conventional methods. It’s as if we are now able to fly whereas previously we could only walk. The data obtained from our cancer predisposition panels will help to supplement the right treatments straight away and reduce risk of cancer development!

Many cancers detected at an early stage are preventable!

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